Sanctum - Nov10

Monday, 1 November, 2010

Mark Broomhead talks heavy metal and black sheep as he tells us about Sanctum, an alternative worship service in Chesterfield and the community he hopes to start.

Duration: 3:51   | Download Download mp3

Transcript

Introducer: Pioneer minister Mark Broomhead used to lead a fresh expression of church called Sanctum, but is just about to establish a new community in Chesterfield. As he explained to Karen Carter, his pioneering ministry to those on the edge has been inspired, to some extent, by his love of heavy metal.

Mark Broomhead: I think it was Cheggers plays pop I was watching with my dad when I was young and Judas Priest came on. And from that moment on I thought there's something about that I like. And so I started getting involved in the metal scene and I had friends at school who were interested in it, I went to my first concert to see Saxon I think it was in the second year as it was called then and then I was a convert really. But I had a very strong Christian faith as well and a lot of people saw that there was a bit of a problem with the two. But I thought maybe I could have some sort of positive influence. And it did used to annoy me that the music I liked to listen to didn't have the lyrics I wanted to listen to so I set up my first band called Detritus back in, I don't know, 1986 or something. And I've been involved playing in bands and been involved in that community since then really.

Interviewer: And I know you've been involved with the Bloodstock Festival, maybe tell us a little bit about that.

Mark Broomhead: Yeah, I mean that's a festival that's fairly local to us but it's one of the main heavy metal festivals in the country, probably the more specialist end. You've got your Viking metal and some of your satanic metal and pirate metal and all kinds of things, so it's kind of your geeky end of the market probably, but we go there and we run what's called their welfare provision and we look after people who are disorientated, had too much to drink or feeling depressed or want somebody to talk to, and we're kind of a Christian presence in that arena really.

Interviewer: And tell me about this new venture that you're involved in now.

Mark Broomhead: Well we're slowly setting up a community that we've called the Order of the Black Sheep. The black sheep was always looked at as the worthless sheep of the flock, the one that couldn't produce any wool that was any good, and in medieval times was seen as a sign of satanic devil or something, I mean really pushed to one side. And we think that sometimes some of the alternative community feel a little bit like the black sheep of society and sometimes people within the church feel a little bit like that, so we want to do something that's home to these sort of people really – your bikers and your skaters and all sorts of things really. So it's quite a wide bracket which is basically anything that's not your very mainstream.

Interviewer: The building that you've found, you're going to be calling it the Gates. Is that right?

Mark Broomhead: Gates are mentioned I think it's a hundred and something odd times in the Bible, there's a couple that stand out to me. I mean, basically when Jesus was saying to Peter I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it, that's the main one. In the Psalms when it says, I'm paraphrasing but fling open your gates so that the King of Glory may come in. So the two things really, we want to build a church almost at the gates of hell really, where people would see as being a dodgy are to be in, but just to go and build a church and to be proud of that, but also just to allow the King of Glory to come into that community and do what he wants to do.

Interviewer: You don't necessarily have to be a heavy metal fan?

Mark Broomhead: No, no. That's just where I grew up, so that's my bias.

Introducer: Mark Broomhead, and again go to the story section of our website to find out more.

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